I'm Lindsay, I like things, and I'll answer just about any question.
Reblogged from dftbbrodiekate  41,737 notes

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

Reblogged from smarchit  567,678 notes
  • 1:

    Talk about the first time you watched your favorite movie.

  • 2:

    Talk about your first kiss.

  • 3:

    Talk about the person you've had the most intense romantic feelings for.

  • 4:

    Talk about the thing you regret most so far.

  • 5:

    Talk about the best birthday you've had.

  • 6:

    Talk about the worst birthday you've had.

  • 7:

    Talk about your biggest insecurity.

  • 8:

    Talk about the thing you are most proud of.

  • 9:

    Talk about little things on your body that you like the most.

  • 10:

    Talk about the biggest fight you've ever had.

  • 11:

    Talk about the best dream you've ever had.

  • 12:

    Talk about the worst dream you've ever had.

  • 13:

    Talk about the first time you had sex/how you imagine your first time.

  • 14:

    Talk about a vacation.

  • 15:

    Talk about the time you were most content in life.

  • 16:

    Talk about the best party you've ever been to.

  • 17:

    Talk about someone you want to be friends with.

  • 18:

    Talk about something that happened in elementary school.

  • 19:

    Talk about something that happened in middle school.

  • 20:

    Talk about something that happened in high school.

  • 21:

    Talk about a time you had to turn someone down.

  • 22:

    Talk about your worst fear.

  • 23:

    Talk about a time someone turned you down.

  • 24:

    Talk about something someone told you that meant a lot.

  • 25:

    Talk about an ex-best friend.

  • 26:

    Talk about things you do when you're sick.

  • 27:

    Talk about your favorite part of someone else's body.

  • 28:

    Talk about your fetishes.

  • 29:

    Talk about what turns you on.

  • 30:

    Talk about what turns you off.

  • 31:

    Talk about what you think death is like.

  • 32:

    Talk about a place you remember from your childhood.

  • 33:

    Talk about what you do when you are sad.

  • 34:

    Talk about the worst physical pain you've endured.

  • 35:

    Talk about things you wish you could stop doing.

  • 36:

    Talk about your guilty pleasures.

  • 37:

    Talk about someone you thought you were in love with.

  • 38:

    Talk about songs that remind you of certain people.

  • 39:

    Talk about things you wish you'd known earlier.

  • 40:

    Talk about the end of something in your life.

Reblogged from fishingboatproceeds  9,678 notes
fishingboatproceeds:

rezzanleite:

On April 15 1989 , 24,000 Liverpool fans travelled to a football match. 96 never returned home.

The Hillsborough disaster occurred 25 year ago today. For decades, fans were blamed for the deaths of their family members and friends, and they were accused of stealing wallets from corpses. It was all lies concocted by the authorities—including elected officials—and spread by tabloids.
In the picture you see above, two young supporters of rival clubs—Liverpool and Everton—stand together to honor the memory of the 96 and to thank those who’ve battled for decades to uncover the truth. 

fishingboatproceeds:

rezzanleite:

On April 15 1989 , 24,000 Liverpool fans travelled to a football match. 96 never returned home.

The Hillsborough disaster occurred 25 year ago today. For decades, fans were blamed for the deaths of their family members and friends, and they were accused of stealing wallets from corpses. It was all lies concocted by the authorities—including elected officials—and spread by tabloids.

In the picture you see above, two young supporters of rival clubs—Liverpool and Everton—stand together to honor the memory of the 96 and to thank those who’ve battled for decades to uncover the truth.